Structural Stability of Steel by Galambos and Surovek
Book Details :
LanguageEnglish
Pages381
FormatPDF
Size10.1 MB


Structural Stability of Steel by Galambos and Surovek



Structural Stability of Steel Concepts and Applications for Structural Engineers by Theodore V. Galambos and Andrea E. Surovek | PDF Free Download.

Structural Stability of Steel Contents


  • CHAPTER 1 FUNDAMENTALS OF STABILITY THEORY
  • CHAPTER 2 ELASTIC BUCKLING OF PLANAR COLUMNS
  • CHAPTER 3 INELASTIC COLUMN BUCKLING
  • CHAPTER 4 BEAM-COLUMNS
  • CHAPTER 5 FRAME STABILITY
  • CHAPTER 6 LATERAL-TORSIONAL BUCKLING
  • CHAPTER 7 BRACING
  • CHAPTER 8 SPECIFICATION-BASED APPLICATIONS OF STABILITY IN STEEL DESIGN

Preface to Structural Stability of Steel PDF


In order to truly understand the behavior and design of metal structures, an engineer needs to have a fundamental understanding of structural stability.

More so than structures designed using other construction materials, steel structures are governed to a great extent on stability limit states.

All major international design specifications include provisions based on stability theory. The purpose of this book is to provide students and practicing engineers with both the theory governing stability of steel structures and a practical look at how that theory translates into design methodologies currently implemented in steel design specifications.

The topics presented in the text pertain to various aspects of elastic buckling and inelastic instability.

An understanding of stability limits is very important in the design of structures: Catastrophic failures can, and tragically have resulted from violating fundamental principles of stability in design.

Maintaining stability is particularly important during the erection phase of construction, when the structural skeleton is exposed prior to the installation of the final stabilizing features, such as slabs, walls and/or cladding.

The book contains a detailed treatment of the elastic and inelastic stability analysis of columns, beams, beam-columns, and frames. In addition, it provides numerous worked examples. Practice problems are included at the end of each chapter.

The first six chapters of this book are based on lecture notes of the first author, used in his teaching of structural engineering graduate courses since 1960, first at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, (1960–1965), then at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, (1966–1981), and finally at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

The genesis of the course material was in lectures at Lehigh University given by Professors Bruce Johnston, Russell Johnson, and Bruno Thurlimann in the 1950s.

The material in the last two chapters is concerned with the application of stability theory in the practical design of steel structures, with special emphasis on examples based on the 2005 Specification for Structural Steel Buildings of the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC).

Chapter 7 is based heavily on the work performed by Professors Joe Yura and Todd Helwig of the University of Texas in developing Appendix 6 of the 2005 AISC Specification.

A portion of the material in Chapter 8 is based on the work of the second author and Professor Don White of Georgia Tech, as well as verification studies and design examples developed by members of AISC TC 10, chaired by Dr. Shankar Nair.

The material in the book is suitable for structural engineering students at the graduate level. It is also useful for design engineers who wish to understand the background of the stability design criteria in structural specifications, or for those who may have a need to investigate special stability problems.

Since the fundamental mechanisms governing the behavior of beams, columns, beam-columns, and frames are discussed in the book, it is also useful for an international structural engineering constituency.

A background in both structural analysis approaches and differential equations is essential in understanding the derivations included in the first six chapters.

Chapter 1 is an introduction to the principles of stability theory. The various aspects of behavior at the limits of instability are defined in hand of simple spring-bar examples.

Chapter 2 deals with the stability of axially loaded planar elastic systems. Individual columns, simple frames, and subassemblies of members are analyzed.

The background for the effective length concept of designing metal structures is also presented. Chapter 3 expands the analysis of nonlinear material behavior. Tangent modulus, reduced modulus, and maximum strength theories are introduced.

Derivations are presented that lead to an understanding of modern column design formulas in structural codes.

The subject of Chapter 4 is the elastic and inelastic stability limit of planar beam-columns. Various aspects of the interaction between axial force and bending moment are presented, and the interaction formulas in design specifications are evaluated.

Chapter 5 illustrates many features of elastic and inelastic instability of planar frames using as an example of a one-story two-bay structure. In Chapter 6 the out-of-plane lateral-torsional buckling of beams, columns, and beam-columns is presented.

Since the stability of the structure is vitally dependent on the strength and stiffness of the bracing systems that are provided during erection and in the final stage of construction, Chapter 7 is devoted entirely to this subject.

Modern design standards for structural steel design require an analysis procedure that provides stability through the direct inclusion of the destabilizing effects of structural imperfections, such as residual stresses and unavoidable out-of-plumb geometry.

The topic of Chapter 8 is the analysis and design of steel frames according to the 2005 Specification of the AISC.

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