The Complete Guide to Plumbing Updated 6th Edition
Book Details :
LanguageEnglish
Pages304
FormatPDF
Size55.4



The Complete Guide to Plumbing Updated 6th Edition




The Complete Guide to Plumbing Updated 6th Edition Current with 2015-2018 Plumbing Codes | PDF Free Download.

The Complete Guide to Plumbing Contents 


INSTALLING FIXTURES & FAUCETS

  • Toilets
  • Kitchen Faucets
  • Kitchen Drains & Traps
  • Dishwashers
  • Food Disposers
  • Water Heaters
  • Bathroom Faucets
  • Shower Kits
  • Custom Shower Bases
  • Wet Rooms & Curbless Showers
  • Alcove Bathtubs
  • Sliding Tub Doors 
  • Jetted Tub 
  • Bidets
  • Urinals 
  • Water Softeners 
  • Hot Water Dispenser 
  • Icemakers
  • Pot Filler 
  • Reverse-Osmosis Water Filters 
  • Frost-proof Sillcocks
  • Pedestal Sinks 
  • Wall-Hung Vanities 
  • Vessel Sinks 
  • Kitchen Sinks 
  • Standpipe Drains 

 INSTALLING PLUMBING LINES  

  • Installation Basics 
  • Planning Plumbing Routes 

PLUMBING REPAIRS 

  • Common Toilet Problems
  • Clogged Toilets 
  • Toilet Flanges 
  • Toilet Drain Lines 
  • Sink Faucets 
  • Kitchen Sprayers 
  • Fixing Leaky Tubs & Shower Faucets 
  • Single-Handle Tub & Shower Faucet with Scald Control 
  • Tubs & Showers 
  • Sink Drains 
  • Branch & Main Drains 
  • Supply Pipes 
  • Noisy Pipes 

PLUMBING TOOLS, MATERIALS & SKILLS  

  • Plumbing Tools 
  • Plumbing Materials 
  • Copper 
  • Rigid Plastic Pipe 
  • Working with Outdoor Flexible Plastic Pipe 
  • Cross-Linked Polyethylene (PEX) 
  • Cast Iron 
  • Pipe Fittings 
  • Shutoff Valves 
  • Valves & Hose Bibs 
  • Compression Fittings 

Introduction to The Complete Guide to Plumbing PDF


Plumbing is a large and varied DIY category. As you explore it, you’ll find that the tasks you encounter can differ in difficulty, just as taking a pop quiz in math differs from getting a Ph.D. in physics.

Fixing that drip in your sink drain might be as simple as tightening the compression nut on your P-trap: about a ten-second job.

But running new lines for that extra bathroom you’ve been wanting in the basement? You’re looking at jackhammers, dumpsters, multiple inspections, and many weeks of hard labor.

But as variable as the jobs we lump into the “plumbing” category are, they have one important thing in common: doing the job yourself can save you a ton of money.

The key to doing the work yourself is twofold: you need ambition, and you need good information. The ambition is pretty much up to each homeowner, but when it comes to information, we’re here to help.

For more than a decade, BLACK+DECKER The Complete Guide to Plumbing has been the leading plumbing manual for do-it-yourselfers. Now in its updated 6th edition and boasting one million copies sold, it is the clearest and most complete plumbing book you can own.

From its easy-to-understand explanations of how modern plumbing works to its clear howto photos of the most common home plumbing projects, this is the only plumbing book you’ll need to become master of your home plumbing system.

This edition of The Complete Guide to Plumbing has been revised and updated to conform to national plumbing codes in effect from 2015 through 2018.

National plumbing codes change every three years, and we pay attention to what’s new so you don’t have to. The truth is, though, most of the national code updates are aimed at large commercial buildings and multi-unit dwellings, not single-family homes.

Many code changes apply only to new construction. But codes also change for a reason, and the reason is almost always to improve safety.

That’s why we think monitoring the changes and reporting them back in the form of updated editions of our book is so important. Your municipal building department may not have adopted the changes yet, but we think you should.

When it comes to the safety of your family, we always urge you to fall on the side of “code-plus.” It isn’t coded alone that prompts us to make sure our DIY books stay as current as possible. It’s also convenient.

Every year, manufacturers and toolmakers come out with new products and ideas that are specifically designed for the home DIYer.

Some are better than others, but we watch them closely, and when we see a better way to accomplish your goal with a greater likelihood of success, we’ll show it to you.

Take flexible supply tubes, for example—it wasn’t long ago that appliances and fixtures were supplied with water and gas in rigid pipes.

Rigid pipes (and even so-called flexible copper tubing) is reliable, but every time you move your dishwasher or bump your water heater, you risk breaking the connection or kinking the tubing.

Because most codes now allow flexible gas and water supply tubing for hookups, we’ve taken care to show how hook-ups are being made with these simple products wherever it makes sense.

That’s why we’re confident that when you use this book as a guide for any home plumbing job, you can be assured that you’re getting the latest and best information. 

The Home Plumbing System

Because most of a plumbing system is hidden inside walls and floors, it may seem to be a complex maze of pipes and fittings.

But spend a few minutes with us and you’ll gain a basic understanding of your system. Understanding how home plumbing works is an important first step toward doing routine maintenance and money-saving repairs.

A typical home plumbing system includes three basic parts: a water supply system, a fixture and appliance set, and a drain system.

These three parts can be seen clearly in the photograph of the cutaway house on the opposite page.

Freshwater enters a home through the main supply line (1). This freshwater source is provided by either a municipal water company or a private underground well.

If the source is a municipal supplier, the water passes through a meter (2) that registers the amount of water used.

A family of four uses about 400 gallons of water each day. Immediately after the main supply enters the house, a branch line splits off (3) and is joined to a water heater (4).

From the water heater, a hot water line runs parallel to the cold water line to bring the water supply to fixtures and appliances throughout the house.

Fixtures include sinks, bathtubs, showers, and laundry tubs. Appliances include water heaters, dishwashers, clothes washers, and water softeners. Toilets and exterior sillcocks are examples of fixtures that require only a cold water line.

The water supply to fixtures and appliances is controlled with faucets and valves. Faucets and valves have moving parts and seals that eventually may wear out or break, but they are easily repaired or replaced. The wastewater then enters the drain system.

It first must flow past a drain trap (5), a U shaped piece of pipe that holds standing water and prevents sewer gases from entering the home.

Every fixture must have a drain trap. The drain system works entirely by gravity, allowing waste water to flow downhill through a series of large diameter pipes.

These drain pipes are attached to a system of vent pipes. Vent pipes (6) bring air into the drain system to prevent suction or pressure that might allow the trap to lose its water seal.

Vent pipes usually exit the house at a roof vent (7). All wastewater eventually reaches a drainage stack or a building drain (8). 

Water Supply System 

Water supply pipes carry hot and cold water throughout a house. In homes built before 1960, the original supply pipes were usually made of galvanized steel.

Newer homes have supply pipes made of copper. Beginning in the 1980s, supply pipes made of rigid CPVC plastic became more commonplace, and the more recent plumbing innovations find PEX pipe widely used and accepted.

Water supply pipes are made to withstand the high pressures of the water supply system. They have small diameters, usually ½" to 1", and are joined with strong, watertight fittings.

The hot and cold lines run in tandem to all parts of the house. Usually, the supply pipes run inside wall cavities or are strapped to the undersides of floor joists.

Hot and cold water supply pipes are connected to fixtures or appliances. Fixtures include sinks, tubs, and showers. Some fixtures, such as toilets or hose Drain pipes use gravity to carry wastewater away from fixtures, appliances, and other drain openings.

This wastewater is carried out of the house to a municipal sewer system or septic tank. Newer drain pipes are plastic. In an older home, drain pipes may be cast iron, galvanized steel, copper, or lead.

Because they are not part of the supply system, lead drainpipes pose no health hazard. However, lead pipes are no longer manufactured for home plumbing systems. Drain pipes have diameters ranging from 1¼" to 4".

These large diameters allow waste to pass through efficiently. Traps are an important part of the drain system. These curved sections of drainpipe hold standing bibs are supplied only by cold water. Appliances include dishwashers and clothes washers.

A refrigerator icemaker uses only cold water. Tradition says that hot water supply pipes and faucet handles are found on the left-hand side of a fixture, with cold water on the right. Because it is pressurized, the water supply system is occasionally prone to leaks.

This is especially true of the galvanized iron pipe, which has limited resistance to corrosion. For some houses in older neighborhoods, the main supply line running from the street to the house is made of lead; this once posed a health hazard.

Today, however, municipalities with lead pipes often add a trace amount of phosphate to the water, which coats the inside of the pipes and virtually eliminates leaching of lead into the water.

If you are concerned about lead in your water, check with your local water supplier. 

Drain-Waste-Vent System

Drain pipes use gravity to carry wastewater away from fixtures, appliances, and other drain openings.

This wastewater is carried out of the house to a municipal sewer system or septic tank. Newer drain pipes are plastic.

In an older home, drain pipes may be cast iron, galvanized steel, copper, or lead. Because they are not part of the supply system, lead drainpipes pose no health hazard. However, lead pipes are no longer manufactured for home plumbing systems.

Drain pipes have diameters ranging from 1¼" to 4". These large diameters allow waste to pass through efficiently.

Traps are an important part of the drain system. These curved sections of the drainpipe hold standing bibs are supplied only by cold water. Appliances include dishwashers and clothes washers. A refrigerator icemaker uses only cold water.

Tradition says that hot water supply pipes and faucet handles are found on the left-hand side of a fixture, with cold water on the right.

Because it is pressurized, the water supply system is occasionally prone to leaks. This is especially true of the galvanized iron pipe, which has limited resistance to corrosion.

For some houses in older neighborhoods, the main supply line running from the street to the house is made of lead; this once posed a health hazard.

Today, however, municipalities with lead pipes often add a trace amount of phosphate to the water, which coats the inside of the pipes and virtually eliminates leaching of lead into the water. If you are concerned about lead in your water, check with your local water supplier.

water and they are usually found immediately after the drain tailpiece in the drain opening. The standing water of a trap prevents sewer gases from backing up into the home.

Each time a drain is used, the standing trap water is flushed away and is replaced by new water. In order to work properly, the drain system requires air. Air allows wastewater to flow freely down drain pipes. To allow air into the drain system, drain pipes are connected to vent pipes.

All drain systems must include vents, and the entire system is called the drain waste vent (DWV) system. One or more vents, located on the roof, provide the air needed for the DWV system to work.

Download The Complete Guide to Plumbing Updated 6th Edition in PDF Format For Free.