Modern Diesel Technology Light Duty Diesels
Book Details :
LanguageEnglish
Pages434
FormatPDF
Size44.8 MB


Modern Diesel Technology Light Duty Diesels



Modern Diesel Technology Light Duty Diesels by Sean Bennett | PDF Free Download.

Light Duty Diesels Contents


  • CHAPTER 1 Shop and Personal Safety
  • CHAPTER 2 Introduction to Diesel Engines 
  • CHAPTER 3 Cylinder Block Assemblies
  • CHAPTER 4 Timing Geartrain and Cylinder Head Assemblies 
  • CHAPTER 5 Intake and Exhaust Systems 
  • CHAPTER 6 Cooling and Lubrication Circuits 
  • CHAPTER 7 Fuel Subsystems
  • CHAPTER 8 Injector Nozzles 
  • CHAPTER 9 Pump-Line-Nozzle Injection Systems 
  • CHAPTER 10 Electronic Diesel Fuel Injection Systems
  • CHAPTER 11 Charging and Starter Circuits 
  • CHAPTER 12 Engine Electronics 
  • CHAPTER 13 Emission Controls
  • CHAPTER 14 Servicing and Maintenance 
  • CHAPTER 15 Diagnostics and Testing

Preface to Modern Diesel Technology Light Duty Diesels


This ninth textbook in the Modern Diesel Technology series takes a look at the light-duty diesel engines that are beginning to notch some sales success in North American markets.

The American consumer has traditionally regarded the diesel engine as a workhorse powerplant, so most of the sales have been in the vocational pickup truck segment of the market.

While the big three U.S. auto original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) have optioned diesel power in pickup trucks for more than two decades, sales have been sluggish until recently. One explanation was that the light-duty diesel engines of the early 1990s were dirty, underpowered, and prone to costly breakdowns.

Combine this with the poor infrastructure of diesel fuel supply outlets and it was no wonder that diesel struggled to achieve significant market share.

The technology of the American-built diesel engine changed more than a decade ago.

A new generation of electronically controlled engines out powered and out torque their gasoline-fueled rivals while providing greater longevity with lower maintenance.

Farmers were probably the first to realize this, perhaps because as a consumer group they had the least reason to mistrust the diesel engine: for four decades, diesel has powered a large percentage of agricultural equipment.

Although the growth of diesel engine sales is slower than I would have predicted five years ago, slowly but surely their market share is expanding, helped by the excellent offerings by Ford, GM, and Chrysler in their current small trucks.

The 2011 Ford 6.7L is of particular note because this engine is engineered and manufactured from scratch within the Ford Motor Company. More perplexing is the reluctance of the American consumer to consider diesel power in the family automobile.

Auto diesel has been accepted in Europe for decades where they are purchased for fuel economy, lower maintenance, longevity, and better performance.

The winner’s circle in the grueling, highspeed LeMans 24-hour automobile race in France has been dominated by diesel power for years, and on-highway variants of these engines are a popular muscle car option.

For some reason, domestic OEMs have bet the barn on gasoline hybrid electric power (GHEP) and marketed this technology accordingly.

While GHEP might make sense in a vehicle that operates in a stop-start city environment, it makes a lot less when that vehicle is run on the interstate, when it becomes exclusively gasoline-powered.

GHEP is a great solution for city vehicles such as pickup and delivery vans and transit buses, but it competes poorly with diesel power in a general-purpose family automobile.

While the focus of this book is primarily on the post-2010 crop of light-duty vocational and automobile engines, some text is also devoted to some of the earlier electronic and hydromechanical diesel.

Special attention is devoted to the Ford 2011 6.7L, the 2011 GM Duramax 6600, and the 2010 Cummins ISB that powers Dodge pickups. Today’s stringent emissions requirements require an elaborate range of precombustion, combustion, and post-combustion apparatus to be fitted on engines, and these are studied from a technician’s perspective.

Multiplexing is a fact of life in any current vehicle. For this reason, the light-duty generations of CAN technology have to be included.

It is a challenge to make complex electronics technology understandable, so I have adopted a ‘‘have-to-know’’ approach in attempting to make CAN-AM, CAN-B, J1850, and CAN-C easily understood.

Modern Diesel Technology: Light Duty Diesel covers the task fields required by the newly introduced ASE A9 certification test addressing light diesel technology.

For this reason, there is a detailed maintenance and troubleshooting chapter designed to help readers undertake basic maintenance tasks and navigate OEM online service information and diagnostic systems, along with an introduction to some of the electronic service tools used in the industry.

Throughout the book, the objective is to provide the key theory required to enable sound hands-on shop floor skills, presented in a user-friendly manner.

I would like to This ninth textbook in the Modern Diesel Technology series takes a look at the light-duty diesel engines that are beginning to notch some sales success in North American markets.

The American consumer has traditionally regarded the diesel engine as a workhorse powerplant, so most of the sales have been in the vocational pickup truck segment of the market.

While the big three U.S. auto original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) have optioned diesel power in pickup trucks for more than two decades, sales have been sluggish until recently. One explanation was that the light-duty diesel engines of the early 1990s were dirty, underpowered, and prone to costly breakdowns.

Combine this with the poor infrastructure of diesel fuel supply outlets and it was no wonder that diesel struggled to achieve significant market share. The technology of the American-built diesel engine changed more than a decade ago.

A new generation of electronically controlled engines out powered and out torque their gasoline-fueled rivals while providing greater longevity with lower maintenance.

Farmers were probably the first to realize this, perhaps because as a consumer group they had the least reason to mistrust the diesel engine: for four decades, diesel has powered a large percentage of agricultural equipment.

Although the growth of diesel engine sales is slower than I would have predicted five years ago, slowly but surely their market share is expanding, helped by the excellent offerings by Ford, GM, and Chrysler in their current small trucks.

The 2011 Ford 6.7L is of particular note because this engine is engineered and manufactured from scratch within the Ford Motor Company. More perplexing is the reluctance of the American consumer to consider diesel power in the family automobile.

Auto diesel has been accepted in Europe for decades where they are purchased for fuel economy, lower maintenance, longevity, and better performance.

The winner’s circle in the grueling, highspeed LeMans 24-hour automobile race in France has been dominated by diesel power for years, and on-highway variants of these engines are a popular muscle car option.

For some reason, domestic OEMs have bet the barn on gasoline hybrid electric power (GHEP) and marketed this technology accordingly.

While GHEP might make sense in a vehicle that operates in a stop-start city environment, it makes a lot less when that vehicle is run on the interstate, when it becomes exclusively gasoline-powered.

GHEP is a great solution for city vehicles such as pickup and delivery vans and transit buses, but it competes poorly with diesel power in a general-purpose family automobile.

While the focus of this book is primarily on the post-2010 crop of light-duty vocational and automobile engines, some text is also devoted to some of the earlier electronic and hydromechanical diesel.

Special attention is devoted to the Ford 2011 6.7L, the 2011 GM Duramax 6600, and the 2010 Cummins ISB that powers Dodge pickups.

Today’s stringent emissions requirements require an elaborate range of precombustion, combustion, and post-combustion apparatus to be fitted on engines, and these are studied from a technician’s perspective.

Multiplexing is a fact of life in any current vehicle. For this reason, the light-duty generations of CAN technology have to be included.

It is a challenge to make complex electronics technology understandable, so I have adopted a ‘‘have-to-know’’ approach in attempting to make CAN-AM, CAN-B, J1850, and CAN-C easily understood.

Modern Diesel Technology: Light Duty Diesel covers the task fields required by the newly introduced ASE A9 certification test addressing light diesel technology.

For this reason, there is a detailed maintenance and troubleshooting chapter designed to help readers undertake basic maintenance tasks and navigate OEM online service information and diagnostic systems, along with an introduction to some of the electronic service tools used in the industry.

Throughout the book, the objective is to provide the key theory required to enable sound hands-on shop floor skills, presented in a user-friendly manner.

I would like to especially thank John Murphy of Centennial College in Toronto, and Bob Starr of the Automotive Technical Training Center in New York City for their feedback in preparing the manuscript for this book.

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