How To Make Your Car Last Forever by Tom Torbjornsen
Book Details :
LanguageEnglish
Pages683
FormatPDF
Size28.6 MB


How To Make Your Car Last Forever by Tom Torbjornsen



How To Make Your Car Last Forever Avoid Expensive Repairs, Improve Fuel Economy, Understand Your Warranty, Save Money by Tom Torbjornsen | PDF Free Download.

Author of How To Make Your Car Last Forever


Tom Torbjornsen makes learning about cars easy with his personal approach, his expert advice, and his high-energy style.

Tom’s varied experiences have given him a firsthand look at the automotive industry from many perspectives. Tom is a writer for AOL Autos, Edmunds, CNN, and many other websites.

He’s also the creator and host of the widely acclaimed radio call-in talk program, America’s Car Show with Tom Torbjornsen, which airs on the XM Sirius Satellite Radio Channel and the SSI Radio Network.

How To Make Your Car Last Forever Contents


SECTION 1: VEHICULAR SYSTEMS

  • CHAPTER 2 The Engine
  • CHAPTER 3 Transmissions and Drivetrains
  • CHAPTER 4 Steering, Suspensions, and Wheel Alignment
  • CHAPTER 5 Tires
  • CHAPTER 6 Braking Systems
  • CHAPTER 7 Ignition and Fuel Delivery Systems
  • CHAPTER 8 Charging, Electrical, and Starting Systems
  • CHAPTER 9 Cooling Systems

SECTION 2: RULES TO FOLLOW TO MAKE THAT CAR LAST FOREVER

  • CHAPTER 10 Lubrication and Filtration—Another Key to Longevity
  • CHAPTER 11 Reading the “Tea Leaves” of the Fluids
  • CHAPTER 12 Maintenance-Free Cars (Is There Such a Thing?)
  • CHAPTER 13 Vehicle Exterior and Interior Maintenance
  • CHAPTER 14 Common Summer and Winter Woes (and How to Avoid Them)

SECTION 3: STRAIGHT TALK

  • CHAPTER 15 Car Warranties—What’s Covered and What’s Not
  • CHAPTER 16 Make Your Car Last Forever
  • CHAPTER 17 How to Kill a Car

Introduction to How To Make Your Car Last Forever


I was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1956. As a child, I ran to my bedroom window every time a loud car passed by on the streets below.

One unusually hot summer evening I stared out the window, mesmerized by the image of a 1966 Pontiac GTO as it sat at the light waiting to turn left. The car whined and roared as the driver revved the engine.

In retrospect, the sound of that revving engine was like a large piece of juicy bait, and I was a famished large-mouthed bass in a raging stream. I was hooked. I would pursue cars in every way I could, starting with 1/24th scale slot car racing.

I purchased cars, worked on cars, and raced cars well into my early twenties. To support this habit I had to work to earn money.

Somebody told me once to choose my vocation based on what I love to do. The decision was easy. I would work on cars for a living. In 1970, I got my first job working on cars at a gas station in the small town of Willingboro, New Jersey.

I stayed in and around the auto repair industry either as a technician, a service manager, or an auto service center manager until 1989, when I started my own business as a tool and equipment dealer.

I sold tools in a territory in New Jersey for about a year, and then decided to move to western New York to the small city of Jamestown.

One day in late 1990, I walked into a repair shop and saw the owner wringing his hands, upset because he had to make a call to a customer.

He had given the customer a quote to replace a timing belt in her car. The car, a 1984 Ford Escort with a four-cylinder engine, was equipped with an interference engine.

When the timing belt breaks with this type of engine, the valves collide with the pistons and cause major engine damage.

This is exactly what had happened to her car. The technician was terribly distressed because he quoted the customer $225 to replace the belt when, in fact, the repair would cost the customer more than $2,000 because the engine had to be replaced.

As I watched this fellow pace the floor, wrenched with anxiety over a phone call, I had what I like to call an “a-ha!” moment—a realization that there was a need for a better relationship between the public and the auto repair industry.

I decided right then that a radio show, designed to educate motorists on auto repair and maintenance, would meet that need.

Such a radio show would be a great public service to those who listened to it. So in January 1991 America’s Car Show with Tom Torbjornsen was born.

The mission statement of the show was this: To educate consumers and bridge the gap between the auto repair industry and motorists in an effort to build understanding between the two and soften relationships across the service counters.

Nineteen years later, the show is nationally broadcast on Sirius-XM Satellite Radio and the SSI Radio Network.

I am an automotive journalist registered with the International Motor Press Association (IMPA), and I write for AOL Autos, Edmunds.Com, CNN, and many other entities on the web.

During the course of my career, the single most-asked question floated to me over the years has been, “Tom, how do I get the most out of my car?” So when I was asked to write a book, I decided to write How to Make Your Car Last Forever.

This How To Make Your Car Last Forever PDF book is the culmination of all of my answers to this most frequently asked question.

Download How To Make Your Car Last Forever in PDF Format For Free.